Book Club: The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper

By Elijah Hall on Unsplash

We read The Dark is Rising this month, or rather some of us did. I couldn’t fit it in, what with re-reading Pamela Dean’s Tam Lin and listening to She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chen. Perhaps book club reads should take priority, but I suspect I would have made more of an effort if I’d wanted to. I like The Dark is Rising, and I know it’s a much better book than Over Sea, Under Stone; that it’s wonderfully atmospheric and haunting, intense and exciting, but I’m just not in love with it. This has something to do with Will Stanton who is a nice boy, but just not my favourite as I find him too bland and unobjectionable. Jane is arguably just as boring, but she is the one whom I love, so I will definitely be re-reading Greenwitch, September’s book.

I did not choose to make time for The Dark is Rising, but I did spare a thought for Herne the Hunter. When I first read the book, the wild hunt made a strong impression on me. I suspect it was the first time I encountered anything as mysterious and frightening in English folklore. When I lived in England in the 90s, I was disappointed to find that no one I met (then) had heard of him, but in the early 90s, I was delighted that Herne was a key character in ITV’s Robin of Sherwood. Alas, the show has not aged well and the mysterious, mystical Herne now just looks like a man taking the piss in a deer costume. (One of my flatmates in Eastbourne came from Herne Bay, but to my great disappointment, the town was not named after the antlered man, but merely refers to a neighbouring village and its geographical placement, herne or hyrne meaning corner in Old English.)

A screenshot of Herne (played by John Abineri) from ITV’s Robin of Sherwood (1992).

2 thoughts on “Book Club: The Dark is Rising by Susan Cooper

  1. I agree with you about this book of the series, Daphne. Will struck me as too passive. He seems to spend the entire novel waiting for things to happen to him, rather than going out looking for them. And when things do finally come his way, there’s nearly always someone nearby who will get him out of trouble (if no assistant is there to help out, then the “trouble” is merely a warning). The kids in Over Sea, Under Stone at least go out and put themselves into danger, and the parade scene of the carnival held so many layers of fun and danger and interest. I also agree about Greenwitch — it’s my favorite of the entire series. It sparked my interest in Green Man carvings in England.

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